PL | EN
15.09.2013




14.06.2013



14.06.2013

An uneasy feeling comes over you. There is someone inside this shape that you have before your eyes. What is more, you seem to know that this someone is not a stranger. A companion, a reflection, an adversary? A person nonetheless. Something new comes to mind: the form is the reflection of the movement inside. An exclamation taking shape. The surfaces far from trim and finicky. Sometimes of small stature, sometimes an extract from a figure otherwise gigantic. Sometimes looking straight at you, more often looking away, immersed in its own affairs. Dedicated, focused, set on some invisible goal. On the move, on the run even. Dynamic yet sloppy in a way, making you look at its journey with tenderness. Quite capricious still, calling upon you to pay attention, to observe, to watch out for their next move. Even though made of thick stainless steel these still life objects manage to remain very much alive.

														Karolina Harazim


THAW
Imposing ineluctable changes after a fossilized or frozen like state in which many of us hibernate through life instead of living it. Thaw, on one side, as in the beginning of life, freedom of movement. On the other, thaw as a transition imposing movement, fall, failure, success, ascension. Struggle with transformation from stillness, ossification into motion and chaotic fluidity is what caught my attention this time. It appears that each one of us has at least one inert aspect of our lives. A part abandoned, overweighing and slowing us down, pushing our potential for spiritual growth away into the distance. The priority to resume motion is crucial. It results in spontaneous and ambiguous movements as it is unclear whether the figure is falling, turning or leaping forward. Welding together hundreds of “mirrors” animates the sculptures with light and when looked at in motion accentuates their expression and multiplies ambiguity of form.
																								Mateusz Sikora